A City Shrouded In Death—Mexico

According to the Daily Mail, on October 17, Mexican security forces arrested a son of drug lord Guzman in the city of Curiacan, followed by a fierce gun battle with armed members loyal to drug trafficking leaders in the city, where citizens rushed to the streets looking for cover. In order to restore calm in the city, the security forces had to evacuate.

After the incident, Mexican Security Ministry Alfonso Durazo said, “We decided to leave the place and not take Little Guzman to avoid more violent clashes in the area and to bring peace back to the city.” Mexican President Lopez also defended the police action, saying it was to protect the safety of the people. “We don’t want war.” But such comments do not quell public anger, and most citizens are disappointed by the weakness of the Mexican government.

Violent fighting by local drug lords has long spread to Mexican civilians. In 2006, the government announced the formation of a national guard to crack down on smuggling and drug trafficking. However, the number of civilian deaths caused by the fight against drug lords is still not fully counted. Former Mexican iron-willed president Filio Diaz has a famous saying: “Unlucky Mexico is too far from God, too close to the United States.” But in March, Mexico’s current president, Lopez, announced that the drug war was officially over. It’s just that it’s not a victory, it’s a defeat.

 A City Shrouded In Death—Mexico

Sadly, the 13-year drug war has had little effect. The only change is that a lot of people have died. Over the past 13 years, there have been countless violent clashes between Mexican drug traffickers and police and civilians, with more than 200000 registered homicides. Many parts of Mexico have the highest homicide rates in the world. That’s probably why the current president almost begged at a news conference: “there is no war now.” We want peace, and we will achieve peace. ” He tried to trade for peace by softened his clothes to drug traffickers.

 A City Shrouded In Death—Mexico

For 13 years, Mexico has been shrouded in the shadow of death, which has become the main theme of the country. Five years ago, 43 normal students were shot at the scene of a protest against the abuse of power by the mayor’s wife. The guilty mayor and his wife jumped into the wall and ordered the police to “dispose of” the students, while corrupt police handed them over to the local drug cartel to save trouble. They were cut apart by drug traffickers and dumped in a dead well outside the city of Inguadara Hara, Mexico. Drug dealers also abused and killed a police father and son. They stripped off the clothes of the father and son and knelt on the ground with their hands tied behind their backs. Then, in front of a child, cut his father’s throat, bleed, and cut off his head. The child was frightened by the scene, struggling madly and screaming. It wasn’t long before the child was stripped alive. They cut off his chest muscles one by one to reveal white fat. Opening the chest muscle can even clearly see the beating of the heart. They put the dagger into their chest and stirred it, and the drug dealer laughed with the child’s constant howling.

 A City Shrouded In Death—Mexico

Not to mention the defenseless students and the captured father and son, even the high-ranking mayors are hard to escape. On October 15, 2009, Maria Santos Gorrostieta, mayor of Tiqucio, Michoac á n, Mexico, was assassinated with a gun by a drug dealer.On January 2, 2016, Cicela Motta, mayor of Tamisco, Morelo, Mexico, was beaten and brutally killed in the early hours of the morning. On January 1, 2018, Aparicio, mayor of Trasiyako, Oaxaca, Mexico, was assassinated just an hour after he was sworn in. On August 8, 2018, Fernando Prynn, former mayor of the Mexican city of Petrasnegras, took part in a congressional debate when the street was exploded by a killer. On April 23, 2019, a group of masked militants kidnapped David Otreka Aveles, then 33-year-old mayor of Navazen, Michoac á n. His body was found on the outskirts of 50 kilometers. His death was extremely ugly and his hands and feet were tied. It can be seen that he had suffered a great deal of torture before his death.

According to statistics, nearly 100 mayors have been killed in Mexico in the past 10 years, mostly because of drugs. Before they died, they took measures or promulgated laws and regulations against drug traffickers, and some even put forward some suggestions, no matter how much they did, they could not escape the hands of drug traffickers.Although the road to drug control is extremely difficult, it is hoped that the Mexican government will not give up, because we have always believed that justice will eventually prevail over evil forces, only a matter of time.

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